Travelling internationally with your pet – Frequently asked questions

travelling internationally with your pet
Travelling internationally with your pet?  We get a few handy hints to help you get prepared from one of Jetpets resident vets – Katherine.

Travelling internationally with your pet – frequently asked questions

Q: What top tips would you give to pet owners preparing their pets for a long haul flight?

A: We always recommend pet owners start the process of familiarising their pets with the travel crate early.  Other things you can do to help include taking them on lots of car journeys in the travel crate so they get used to the crate and the movement, remain calm around them on the day of departure (we know it’s hard!) and add a recently worn old T shirt to the travel crate so they have the owners scent to calm them on the flight.

Q: Will my pet be fed before they fly?

A: We do not recommend feeding your pet within 8 hours of their flight as it may cause travel sickness. They will receive plenty of water throughout their journey.

Q: Will my pet get a chance to stretch their legs before they fly?

A: Yes, if you have a dog, our team ensure your pet is taken for a good walk before they fly. They will also relax in the Jetpets Transit Lounge before their flight, where they can walk around.

Cats will have the opportunity to stretch their legs in the Jetpets Transit Lounge before their flight.

Q: Why do pets have to be at the airport 3 hours before departure?

Like humans, pets are required to check in early for their flight too. The airlines require pets to be checked in 3 hours before international departure.

Q: Who loads them onto the plane?

After we check your pet in for their flight, the friendly airline staff will load them onto the plane.

Q: Where will my pet sit on the plane?

Your pet will travel in the pet’s cabin. The pets cabin is air pressured, climate controlled and dimly lit. Your pets will experience the same sounds and feelings as us, except they have a lot more leg room!

Q: Do pets get jet lag Katherine?

A: Just like humans, it’s possible that pets may also experience jet lag to a lesser extent. I’ve had the odd person tell me they think their pet had jet lag for a few days after their flight. Older pets in particular might take a bit longer to get used to their new time zone after a long flight.

Q: Do pets having any issues with a sudden change in climate?

If your pets are travelling from a hot to a very cold climate I would make sure they are kept inside or at least make sure they have a good warm coat to put on when they do go outside. If they are travelling from a cold to a hot climate, only walk them early in the morning or late in the evening and make sure they always have plenty of water and shade available (or keep them in the air-con).

JetPets Resident Vets are experts in pet travel, and are the best people to speak to if you have any health concerns about your pet. They can provide pet travel advice to customers worldwide, so if you’re planning a global move in the near future, get in contact with our team today.

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